A book review of cross cultural trade in maritime history by philip curtin

This played a major role in the evolution of cultures. Although McNeill praised the book, he criticized its incompleteness. They helping and encouraging closer relationship between the remote societies with the host society.

At beginning merchants were back and fort between their home town and the alien societies. The opening chapters look at Africa, while subsequent chapters treat the ancient world, the Mediterranean trade with China, the Asian trade in the east, and European entry into the trade with maritime Asia, the Armenian trade carriers of the seventeenth century, and the North American fur trade.

This helps readers get a better understanding if the region that is being described. At the end of this section, he talks about the fall of Rome, as well as, the rise of Islam and how this influenced the cross-cultural trade in the region. The slave trade and the West African economy in the eighteenth century; Africa and the slave trade; 4.

Some said this works as a pioneer works on new studies which covers wider context. Much more than an economic order for the Americas, the plantation complex had an important place in world history.

Many of its readers likely are graduate students who sample it while working their way through lists of recommended books. The Bajau sea nomads of South Sulawesi, and The Indian Banian merchants contributed in the development of economy and cultural change in the Asian societies.

The first variable Curtin describes is trade diasporas. Although Curtin is an accessible writer, I would be hesitant to expect undergraduates to read Cross-Cultural Trade in its entirety. For most readers, the details about Africa will be new, the chapter on the Armenians fascinating, and the story of the Bugis in maritime Southeast Asia a complete surprise.

After giving an overview of cross-cultural trade, Curtin begins to describe specific regions and the variables that went into the evolution of the culture in that specific region.

Crosscultural Trade in World History (Studies in Comparative World History)

Foreign merchants remained but not as trade diasporas. The Mediterranean origins; 2.

The Sea and Civilisation: a Maritime History of the World, by Lincoln Paine, review

He specialized in Africa and Atlantic slave trade. Though the plantation complex centered on the American tropics, its influence was much wider. Individual trade diasporas disappeared when once foreign merchants became assimilated or irrelevant.

More precisely, Curtin focused on the alien merchants whose encounters with their hosts encouraged cultural diffusion. For example, in the section about Africa there are five maps. Curtin ends this section by detailing the impact of Westernization and European dominance in trade and cultural evolution.

For me, the most interesting was that by William H. This section begins by describing their trade in the Eastern seas. Curtin is one of the founders of the field of world history as we know it. This encounters bring out certain characteristics and relations among societies.

Cross-Cultural Trade in World History has been a fairly successful book. In part, the problem is its detail, an unending parade of names of people and places and local terminology.Feb 02,  · The Sea and Civilisation: a Maritime History of the World, by Lincoln Paine, review A magnificently sweeping history of 5/5.

May 25,  · Cross-Cultural Trade in World History by Philip D. Curtin,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(34). Cambridge Core - Regional and World History: General Interest - Cross-Cultural Trade in World History - by Philip D.

Curtin.

Cross-cultural trade in world history

Curtin, Philip D. Cross-Cultural Trade in World History (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge and New York, ).

Cross-Cultural Trade in World History

pp, $ Philip D. Curtin is one of the founders of the field of world history as we know it. In contrast with the champions of world systems, he did not propose a general theory offering a master narrative. Cross-cultural trade in world history PHILIP D. CURTIN The way of trade in Eastern seas The European entry into the trade of maritime Asia The Portuguese trading-post empire Sixteenth-century responses of the Asian traders North European competition for the Portuguese The VOC in practice The English East India Company Bugis 5/5(2).

It is the best book on cross-cultural trade since Philip Curtin invented the field more than two decades ago."—Steven Epstein, University of Kansas "The Familiarity of Strangers offers ground-breaking perspectives on social networks and the market, the culture of trust, the history of Sephardic Jews, and the global reach of early modern commerce.

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A book review of cross cultural trade in maritime history by philip curtin
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